Cincinnati Nature Center Blog

Blog Entries - tag: 'Nature learning'

Marking Time Without Calendars

By Laura Weinel, Community Engagement Coordinator Imagine a world where there are no calendars to mark the days and no clocks to count the time. Instead, each passing year is tracked using... plants. Confused yet? Lucky for us read more …

Who Cares?

By Connie O'Connor, Director of Education It’s exciting to learn something new about nature.  And it’s even more fun to share that knowledge with others. “If only they knew more about it,” we might think, “then they’d read more …

A Sunny Garden Flower Gone Awry

by Danie Frevola, Conservation Apprentice Yellow iris (Iris pseudacorus) is a stunning wetland plant with tall and showy yellow flowers (Fig 1.). While it is an attractive landscaping plant, it also peaks gardener’s interest because it can grow in a read more …

Want Biodiversity? Feed the Soil

by Jason Neumann, Public Programs Manager It’s time to vent. After nearly 25 years on staff at Cincinnati Nature Center, there are a couple of things I want to clear up. For the record, I’m fully on board with the Nature Center’s read more …

Go Spots!

By Olivia Espinoza, Natural Areas Manager I’m certain that one of the staples of a childhood is the discovery of a tadpole in a ditch, puddle, or pond. I grew up with a lake in my backyard and would spend the summers with my head peering over the water read more …

The Myth of Groundcover

by Jason Neumann I didn’t plant it, but there it is at the bottom of my wood privacy fence: wintercreeper (Euonymus fortunei). As a naturalist, I know that this unwanted botanical surprise is courtesy of neighborhood birds that relieved themselves read more …

What’s (Probably) Growing in Your Yard: Our Bioblitz Round-Up

By Connie O’Connor and Jason Neumann

We had a great time with our first-ever bioblitz—our Lawn Plant Identification Challenge! We totaled 349 observations of 175 different species in and around lawns in our region!

read more …

The Story of My Land—Keeping a Phenology Journal

By Connie O’Connor    “Every place, like every person, is elevated by the love and respect shown toward it, and by the way its bounty is received.” -- Richard Nelson I bought my first home, hidden away on 3.6 acres of woodland, read more …

Knowledge & Confidence in the Palm of Your Hand

By Connie O’Connor Here’s a confession: I sometimes dread “what’s this” questions when leading a hike. When I teach Ohio Certified Volunteer Naturalist students, they express similar concerns. We can’t know everything, but read more …

At Home with Nature: Nest Building (Ages 2-5)

Children can have lots of fun mimicking the creativity of birds and building with natural objects! You’ll need: A nature space to find building materials and an “egg” (a stone, pinecone, or other egg-shaped read more …

At Home with Nature: Fishing the Old Fashioned Way (Ages 5-12)

Pretend fishing is a fun way to get children outside and practicing their concentration. Younger children may need supervision and help to make sure they are playing safely and having fun. Materials needed: Stick, yarn or read more …

At Home with Nature: Phenology Journal (All Ages)

Spring brings fresh changes outside, making it the perfect time to look at phenology, the study of seasonal changes in nature. You’ll need: A journal, a pencil, and a spot outdoors you can return to read more …

At Home with Nature: Mud Kitchen (Ages 2-5)

You’ll need: Old kitchen utensils, a pile of soil, and a bin of water.   Optional extras: Paper and markers to make your own menu. Mix the water and soil together, either in the bin or on the ground, and let your child play!  Playing with read more …

At Home with Nature: Nature Weaving (Ages 5-12)

You’ll need: Cardboard, scissors, tape, and yarn. Children may need help making their loom.

Optional extras: Markers to decorate the loom.

read more …